Deviled eggs are making a resurgence. They are easy to prepare, are popular for summer picnics and are a party favorite.

Curious to know about the name, I went to the Oxford Companion to food where it says “devil is a culinary term first appearing as a noun in the 18th century, and then in the early 19th century as a verb meaning to cook something with fiery hot spices or condiments.” Other parts of the country call them stuffed, Russian, salad, or dressed eggs.

The North Carolina Egg Association website says, “The deviled egg we know today can be traced back to ancient Rome, where boiled eggs were seasoned with spicy sauces and served as the starter of a fancy meal usually made for guests.

“Serving eggs while entertaining guests was so common for wealthy Romans that they even had a saying for it, ‘ab ova usque ad mala,’ meaning ‘from eggs to apples,’ or from the beginning of a meal to the end.

“During the 5th century, stuffed eggs grew in popularity across Europe. Recipes for boiled eggs filled with raisins, cheese and herbs (such as parsley and mint), then fried and topped with a sauce or powdered sugar were commonly found in medieval cookbooks.

“In the mid-9th century, stuffed eggs found their way to the United States and into cookbooks across the nation.”

After researching the history, I was curious to see whether there are any cookbooks dedicated to deviled eggs. Sure enough, there are a few, including “D’Lish Deviled Eggs: A Collection of Recipes from Creative to Classic,” by Kathy Casey (2013, Andrews McMeel Publishing, $14.99).

She pays homage to a favorite, a simple dish to prepare for your summer picnics.

I was intrigued to learn from reading the book that there are plates specifically designed to serve deviled eggs that began appearing in 1925.

Her list of holidays, along with suggested recipes is helpful. For example, on Father’s Day, show dad he’s No. 1 and serve Steak & Deviled Eggs; and on July 4, bring the All-American Potato Salad Deviled Eggs to the picnic.

The sections about types of eggs (chicken, duck and quail), cooking them and pre-making and storing the fillings, piping the filling, toppings and garnishes will “egg you on” to head to the kitchen and get crackin.’

Here are a few recipes from the book. Show up to the party with one of these dishes and you will always get invited back. For the recipe for Classic Picnic Style Deviled Eggs, visit https://bit.ly/2QxoaSz.

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

With a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, sour cream, mustard, garlic and salt, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this using an electric mixer with a whip attachment.) Stir in the chives and salmon until evenly mixed in. Taste and season accordingly.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a large plain tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

To make the topping, in a small bowl, mix the chives, onion, and vinegar, if desired. Top each egg half with about 3/4 teaspoon of the mixture.

Optional: Garnish with a small piece of smoked salmon on top of each egg half. Makes 24

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

With a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, sour cream, cheddar cheese, salsa, hot sauce, chili powder, and salt, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this using an electric mixer with a whip attachment.) Taste and season accordingly.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a large plain tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

Place the crushed chips in a small bowl and squeeze the lime over them. Toss to coat. Top each egg with 1/4 teaspoon of the sour cream, a small amount of chips, a slice of jalapeno, and a cilantro leaf. Makes 24.

The headnote says, “Tarragon’s anise notes and bright green personality bring an herbaceous attitude to these garden-fresh deviled eggs. For a truly classic Green Goddess flavor, replace the salt with 1 to 2 teaspoons of anchovy paste.”

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set the egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate.

In a mixing bowl, mash the avocado well with a fork, then add the yolks and mash to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, sour cream, garlic, tarragon and salt, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this using an electric mixer with a whip attachment.) Taste and season accordingly.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

Top each egg half with a tarragon leaf and a grind of fresh-cracked black pepper. Makes 24.

The author writes, “I’m a fan of a good dirty martini, and these eggs certainly live up to their name. There are a ton of different gins out there you can use, but pick a juniper-forward gin to really bring home the ‘martini’ experience.”

Halve the eggs lengthwise and transfer the yolks to a mixing bowl. Set 20 egg white halves on a platter, cover, and refrigerate. This recipe uses 12 egg yolks, but only yields enough filling for 20 halves; reserve the extra 4 whites for another use.

With a fork, mash the yolks to a smooth consistency. Add the mayonnaise, mustard, olive brine, Worcestershire sauce, and salt, and mix until smooth. (You can also do this using an electric mixer with a whip attachment.) Stir in the shallots. Taste and season accordingly.

Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a plain or large star tip, then pipe the mixture evenly into the egg white halves. Or fill the eggs with a spoon, dividing the filling evenly.

To make the topping, in a small bowl, mix together the gin, olives, lemon zest, onions, and parsley. Top each egg half with about 1 teaspoon of the mixture. Makes 20.

Chef’s Olive Oil and Balsamic Tasting Event, June 7, 6:30-9 p.m., Chef’s Emporium, 449 Boston Post Road, Orange, $50. Reservations 203-799-2665. Become an informed consumer when deciphering the world of extra virgin olive oil and barrel-aged balsamics. Staff will be on hand to showcase and inspire you with the infinite olive oil and balsamic pairing options and their applications. Chef will also prepare a tasting menu using exclusive line of infused olive oils and balsamic vinegars. Participants will receive a tasting-size oil or balsamic featured in this class.

Consiglio’s Murder Mystery Dinner: “On the Cusp” June 21, 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.), Consiglio’s Restaurant, 165 Wooster St., New Haven, reservations at 203-865-4489, https://bit.ly/2O3TQzQ, $65 includes dinner and show (beverages, tax and gratuity not included). An interactive comedy show that goes on throughout the evening during a three-course meal. Cast mingles table to table, dropping clues for a mystery only you can solve. Wear your silliest beach hat to compete for prizes.

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